What we own and when – part III – 11/12/2017

Today, I will delve even deeper into my statement, “Wall Street makes its money with us being in the market. We make our money with what we own and when.”

Last week, I analyzed four main Dow stocks that grossly outperformed the Dow Jones Index.

Today, we analyze a performance chart of the Nasdaq Composite ($COMPQ) and four additional main Nasdaq companies — Akamai Technologies Inc. (AKAM), Sears Holdings Co. (SHLD), Ritter Pharmaceuticals Inc. (RTTR) and CHFS Solutions Inc. (CHFS). Plus, I included the main Nasdaq Exchange Traded Fund (QQQ).

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What we own and when — part II – 11/5/2017

Today, I will delve deeper into my statement: “Wall Street makes its money with us being in the market. We make our money with what we own and when.”

Last week, I analyzed four main DOW stocks that grossly outperformed the Dow Jones Index.

Today, we analyze a performance chart of the Dow Industrials Index ($INDU) and four additional main Dow companies.

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What we own and when – part I – 10/29/2017

Today, I will answer your questions concerning my statement: “Wall Street makes its money with us being in the market. We make our money with what we own and when.”

To help answer, I designed a performance chart of the Dow Industrials Index ($INDU) and four main DOW companies — ExxonMobil (XOM), Verizon Communications Inc.(VZ), Walt Disney Co. (DIS), and International Business Machines (IBM). Plus, I included the main Dow Exchange Traded Fund, (DIA).

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Examining the market tops, and what they mean — part III 10/22/2017

Today, I will answer your questions and analyze the current market action plus explain what I am watching for to spot the next market top and downturn.

To help answer that question, I designed two charts in one. On the left is the current market action using just three items, the value of the SPX (Standard and Poor’s 500), a trend line and a momentum indicator. There’s no need to make it complicated.

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Examining the market tops, and what they mean — part II 10/15/2017

Today, I will answer your questions and analyze the 2007 market top and show the indicators used to signal it.

To help answer that question, I designed a chart using just three items, the value of the SPX (Standard & Poor’s 500), a trend line and a momentum indicator. There’s no need to make it complicated.

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Examining the market tops, and what they mean – 10/8/2017

Today, I answer your questions on market tops, starting in 2000, plus show indicators used to signal a market top. To help answer that question, I designed a chart using just three items, the value of the SPX (Standard & Poor’s 500), a trendline and a momentum indicator. There’s no need to make it complicated.

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Keep your eyes wide open – part 3 – 9/24/2017

Today, I wrap up this series and analyze the performance of some of the largest bond funds during the 2007-2009 sell-off.

And why is that? To see if money went from equity to bond funds. To eliminate bias, I return to the largest bond funds I analyzed in a previous 2012 column, here at The Southern.

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Keep your eyes wide open – part 2 – 9/17/2017

Last week, I analyzed the reader’s holdings performance when the markets tumbled in 2000. The goal was to see if funds went from equity funds into bond funds during the 2000 correction.

Today, let’s view the performance of five holdings from a follower during the 2007-2009 sell off.

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Keep your eyes wide open 9/10/2017

Last week, I wrapped-up the current series, does the Modern Portfolio Theory work? Today, we’ll start anew by analyzing the reader’s holdings performance when the markets tumbled in 2000. The goal is to see if funds went from equity funds into bond funds during a large pullback.

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Again, does the Modern Portfolio Theory actually work? 8/27/2017

To help answer this question — does the Modern Portfolio Theory work? — I will feature another example showing its strengths and weaknesses.

Last week, I introduced the Modern Portfolio Theory. Let’s review. By investing in more than one stock, an investor can reap the benefits of diversification — chief among them, a reduction in the riskiness of the portfolio.

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